The Library of Congress has added 25 movies to the National Film Registry. Among them: <strong>The Big Lebowski (1998), </strong>starring Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi. Bridges will always be "The Dude" to many of us, thanks to this cult-favorite comedy from the Coen Brothers. The Library of Congress has added 25 movies to the National Film Registry. Among them: The Big Lebowski (1998), starring Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Steve Buscemi. Bridges will always be "The Dude" to many of us, thanks to this cult-favorite comedy from the Coen Brothers.

<strong>13 Lakes (2004)</strong>: This documentary from James Benning trains its lens on 13 different lakes throughout the country in 10-minute segments. 13 Lakes (2004): This documentary from James Benning trains its lens on 13 different lakes throughout the country in 10-minute segments.

<strong>Bert Williams Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913)</strong>: This feature-length project is an important reflection of history, as it stars a group of African-American performers led by vaudeville's Bert Williams, the first African-American to headline on Broadway and the most popular recording artist pre-1920. Although the film itself fell by the wayside, its reels were uncovered at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Bert Williams Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913): This feature-length project is an important reflection of history, as it stars a group of African-American performers led by vaudeville's Bert Williams, the first African-American to headline on Broadway and the most popular recording artist pre-1920. Although the film itself fell by the wayside, its reels were uncovered at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

<strong>Down Argentine Way (1940)</strong>: This '40s musical gave Betty Grable her first Technicolor starring role and helped to establish her as a pinup siren. Down Argentine Way (1940): This '40s musical gave Betty Grable her first Technicolor starring role and helped to establish her as a pinup siren.

<strong>The Dragon Painter (1919):</strong> Sessue Hayakawa is credited as being Hollywood's first Asian star, who went on to own his own production company. "The Dragon Painter" is one of the 20 films Hayakawa's Haworth Pictures produced between 1918 and 1922. The Dragon Painter (1919): Sessue Hayakawa is credited as being Hollywood's first Asian star, who went on to own his own production company. "The Dragon Painter" is one of the 20 films Hayakawa's Haworth Pictures produced between 1918 and 1922.

<strong>Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986): </strong> Between John Hughes writing and directing and Matthew Broderick as the charming but mischievous Ferris Bueller, we weren't only entertained with this '80s comedy -- we learned something, too. As the line goes, "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it." Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986): Between John Hughes writing and directing and Matthew Broderick as the charming but mischievous Ferris Bueller, we weren't only entertained with this '80s comedy -- we learned something, too. As the line goes, "Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it."

<strong>The Gang's All Here (1943): </strong>What's a list of movies that should be preserved for all time without a '40s musical or two? This one starred musical favorite Alice Faye as a showgirl who gets swept off her feet by a man in uniform, plus Carmen Miranda performing her famous "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat."The Gang's All Here (1943): What's a list of movies that should be preserved for all time without a '40s musical or two? This one starred musical favorite Alice Faye as a showgirl who gets swept off her feet by a man in uniform, plus Carmen Miranda performing her famous "The Lady in the Tutti Frutti Hat."

<strong>House of Wax (1953):</strong> The description for this '50s horror movie is enough to give you nightmares: a remake, "House of Wax" told of a sculptor who took a liking to encasing the dead bodies of victims in wax. As if that's not creepy enough, this film was also in full-color and 3-D. House of Wax (1953): The description for this '50s horror movie is enough to give you nightmares: a remake, "House of Wax" told of a sculptor who took a liking to encasing the dead bodies of victims in wax. As if that's not creepy enough, this film was also in full-color and 3-D.

<strong>Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport (2000):</strong> This film won the best documentary Oscar at the 73rd Academy Awards. Helmed by Mark Jonathan Harris, it told the story of 10,000 children who were evacuated from Nazi territory and sent to safety in foster homes just before the dawn of World War II. Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport (2000): This film won the best documentary Oscar at the 73rd Academy Awards. Helmed by Mark Jonathan Harris, it told the story of 10,000 children who were evacuated from Nazi territory and sent to safety in foster homes just before the dawn of World War II.

<strong>Little Big Man (1970): </strong>Leave it to Dustin Hoffman to pull off playing a 121-year-old character, as he did in this Western. Don't use this movie for your history class, but do watch it when you want an example of an imaginative, well-told story. Little Big Man (1970): Leave it to Dustin Hoffman to pull off playing a 121-year-old character, as he did in this Western. Don't use this movie for your history class, but do watch it when you want an example of an imaginative, well-told story.

<strong>Luxo Jr. (1986):</strong> You know that hopping desk lamp seen scooting across the screen before a Pixar film? The object actually has its roots in a 1986 short film called "Luxo Jr.," which featured one large desk lamp and one small desk lamp -- the "junior" of the title. According to the National Film Registry, "Luxo Jr." was the first 3-D computer-animated film to be nominated for an Oscar. Luxo Jr. (1986): You know that hopping desk lamp seen scooting across the screen before a Pixar film? The object actually has its roots in a 1986 short film called "Luxo Jr.," which featured one large desk lamp and one small desk lamp -- the "junior" of the title. According to the National Film Registry, "Luxo Jr." was the first 3-D computer-animated film to be nominated for an Oscar.

<strong>Moon Breath Beat (1980):</strong> Author, illustrator and former Disney animator Lisze Bechtold created this short film when she was still a student at the California Institute of the Arts. To be able to say that her project is now being preserved for posterity, well, those are some bragging rights. Moon Breath Beat (1980): Author, illustrator and former Disney animator Lisze Bechtold created this short film when she was still a student at the California Institute of the Arts. To be able to say that her project is now being preserved for posterity, well, those are some bragging rights.

<strong>Please Don't Bury Me Alive! (1976):</strong> Efraín Gutiérrez wrote, directed, starred in and helped promote this independent film about the value of life and one's place in society in the wake of the Vietnam war. History experts peg this title as the first Chicano feature film. Please Don't Bury Me Alive! (1976): Efraín Gutiérrez wrote, directed, starred in and helped promote this independent film about the value of life and one's place in society in the wake of the Vietnam war. History experts peg this title as the first Chicano feature film.

<strong>Rio Bravo (1959):</strong> It doesn't get more classic than a John Wayne Western, not to mention one that also stars Dean Martin. No matter your generation, this is one retro title that always entertains. Rio Bravo (1959): It doesn't get more classic than a John Wayne Western, not to mention one that also stars Dean Martin. No matter your generation, this is one retro title that always entertains.

<strong>Rosemary's Baby (1968):</strong> Roman Polanski's adaptation of Ira Levin's novel, which tells the story of a young woman who comes to learn that she's birthing the spawn of Satan, just never gets old. It's still so popular that NBC recently tried to remake it as a miniseries starring Zoe Saldana. Rosemary's Baby (1968): Roman Polanski's adaptation of Ira Levin's novel, which tells the story of a young woman who comes to learn that she's birthing the spawn of Satan, just never gets old. It's still so popular that NBC recently tried to remake it as a miniseries starring Zoe Saldana.

<strong>Ruggles of Red Gap (1935):</strong> You know Charles Laughton for his dramatic work in movies like "The Private Life of Henry VIII," for which he won an Oscar, and "The Hunchback of Notre Dame." But the Englishman was an ace comedic actor too, as he showed in this 1935 film. Ruggles of Red Gap (1935): You know Charles Laughton for his dramatic work in movies like "The Private Life of Henry VIII," for which he won an Oscar, and "The Hunchback of Notre Dame." But the Englishman was an ace comedic actor too, as he showed in this 1935 film.

<strong>Saving Private Ryan (1998):</strong> This war epic is bursting at the seams with major actors, and was made by one very major director, Steven Spielberg. Although the World War II drama lost the best picture Oscar to underdog "Shakespeare in Love," Spielberg did secure the Academy Award for best director. Saving Private Ryan (1998): This war epic is bursting at the seams with major actors, and was made by one very major director, Steven Spielberg. Although the World War II drama lost the best picture Oscar to underdog "Shakespeare in Love," Spielberg did secure the Academy Award for best director.

<strong>Shoes (1916):</strong> Writer/director Lois Weber took the adage about not knowing a person until you're in their shoes to a personal level with this film. It follows a young woman who, weary from the weight of supporting her family and yearning for a pair of shoes that aren't in shambles, turns to prostitution to afford them. Shoes (1916): Writer/director Lois Weber took the adage about not knowing a person until you're in their shoes to a personal level with this film. It follows a young woman who, weary from the weight of supporting her family and yearning for a pair of shoes that aren't in shambles, turns to prostitution to afford them.

<strong>State Fair (1933):</strong> If you're looking for wholesome, you don't have to look much farther than this movie set at an Iowa state fair and starring Janet Gaynor and Will Rogers. State Fair (1933): If you're looking for wholesome, you don't have to look much farther than this movie set at an Iowa state fair and starring Janet Gaynor and Will Rogers.

<strong>Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971): </strong>Vibrant, endearing and wickedly funny, Gene Wilder's "Willy Wonka" will always have our hearts. (Sorry, Johnny Depp.)Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (1971): Vibrant, endearing and wickedly funny, Gene Wilder's "Willy Wonka" will always have our hearts. (Sorry, Johnny Depp.)

<strong>The Power and the Glory (1933):</strong> Before "Sullivan's Travels," "The Lady Eve" or "The Palm Beach Story," writer/director Preston Sturges put pen to paper with "The Power and the Glory." It's his first original screenplay, and its story structure is believed to have influenced the cinematic classic "Citizen Kane."The Power and the Glory (1933): Before "Sullivan's Travels," "The Lady Eve" or "The Palm Beach Story," writer/director Preston Sturges put pen to paper with "The Power and the Glory." It's his first original screenplay, and its story structure is believed to have influenced the cinematic classic "Citizen Kane."








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  • The National Film Registry has added 25 more titles

  • That list includes classic comedies like "The Big Lebowski"

  • There are now 650 movies in the Film Registry




(CNN) -- "The Big Lebowski," "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and "Saving Private Ryan" have long been national treasures, but the Library of Congress just made it official.


Every year, the library's National Film Registry selects 25 movies to be added to its roster with the intent of preserving them for "all time." The idea is to collect the projects that best represent "the extraordinary diversity of America's film heritage" and are "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant."


This year's additions range from those aforementioned comedies to Pixar's first short, "Luxo Jr.," to the classic horror flick "Rosemary's Baby." Interestingly enough, given John Hughes' prolific career and how many seminal projects he had a hand in, "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" is the first Hughes film to be added to the registry.


These 25 films bring the total number of movies in the National Film Registry to 650. Check out the gallery above to see 21 of this year's inductees.



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